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Israel VS Syria Part II

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  • #91
    Re: Israel VS Syria Part II

    http://service.spiegel.de/cache/inte...431059,00.html

    August 10, 2006 Print | Send this article | Feedback


    NEGOTIATING WITH HEZBOLLAH

    Syria's Price for Peace

    By Gabriela Keller in Damascus

    Syria may be willing to use its clout with Hezbollah to help end the current conflict in the Middle East -- but at a price. Syria wants the Golan Heights back from Israel. If it doesn't get it, more violence may result.

    The yellow Hezbollah flag has been raised all over Damascus -- flying from cars, draped over balconies and plastered on the sides of buildings all over the city. Images of Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah are likewise omnipresent: tens of thousands of posters and placards depicting the Hezbollah leader have flooded the city. Syrian President Bashar al-Assad is usually shown by his side. Sometimes they are depicted as standing in front of a fiery bomb explosion -- digitally brightened for the greatest Technicolor effect. Young men download Nasrallah's sermons as ring tones for their cell phones, and even Christians light candles for the Shiite leader in church.
    In the historical city center, Damascus resident Faiga Fachouri is browsing the stands selling T-shirts emblazoned with the round and bearded face of Nasrallah. "We're glad Syria is on Hezbollah's side," the 55-year-old says. "Israel is planning to destroy our countries. Nasrallah is fighting to defend our life and our honor. That's why he's a hero to us."

    Hezbollah -- in Syria at least -- is so far the winner of the war being fought in Lebanon. The militant group now has the reverence of the Syrian people, even as it has long had the support of the Syrian regime. It is this support which has led the United States and Israel to place responsibility for Hezbollah's attacks on Israel squarely on the shoulders of Syria. But the longer the Israeli military campaign in Lebanon continues, the more observers in the West agree that the road to peace leads through Damascus. Experts believe that the Syrian leadership is in close touch with the Shiite militia. Its influence could be the key to peace.

    No lasting peace without Syria
    For the US, that's not good news. The Americans have long been trying to isolate the "rogue state" internationally. But the longer the current crisis in the Middle East continues, the more confident Syria seems to get. "We were always a factor in the region," emphasizes Syrian parliamentarian Georges Jabbour, an advisor of former President Hafis al-Assad. "Now the West has given up a little of its foolishness and recognized this fact." The region will never achieve lasting peace without Syria, Jabbour believes. "On the contrary. The violence will spread."
    But Damascus won't act as mediator between the West and Nasrallah's fundamentalist Muslim foot soldiers just like that, says an expert close to the Syrian Foreign Ministry who asked not to be identified. "Why should we help?" he asks. "Let the West head for its own doom thanks to its policies -- that's exactly what's happening now." After all Israel -- a nuclear power -- doesn't yet seem to have gotten any closer to its declared goal of destroying Hezbollah, the expert says.

    "Syria won't do anything until we know what we're getting in return," says Ayman Abdel Nour, one of the reformists in the ruling Baath party. The regime, Nour believes, sees an opportunity to get much more for its cooperation than merely better relations with the West. "Syria," he says, "wants the Golan Heights back. The prospect of getting them back has to be tangible. Promises alone aren't enough."

    Nour, though, also sees this as a chance for the West. Were the Golan Heights on the table, Syria could perhaps even be prepared to turn its back on Iran. "Syria," Nour believes, "would be prepared to abandon this alliance."

    Reclaiming the Golan Heights


    Either way, it looks right now as if the regime in Damascus could emerge from the current crisis as a winner. Syria has already established itself as an influential regional power. And for the first time since the assassination of Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri in February 2005, an official representative of a European government has travelled to Damascus. Spanish Foreign Minister Miguel Moratinos met with President Assad.
    Syria could once more increase its influence in Lebanon too, following the forced withdrawal of its troops in the aftermath of Hariri's death. The anti-Syrian government in Beirut has been weakened and Syria's ally Hezbollah has been strengthened massively, at least ideologically. Which is the main reason Damascus is now pressing for a ceasefire, according to Abdel Nour. Syria wants to prevent the conflict from expanding. "As long as bombs don't start dropping on Damascus," he says, "Syria has won."

    Asking for the return of the Golan Heights -- which have been in Israeli possession since 1967 -- is a no-brainer for the Syrian leadership, says political scientist Samir al Taqi. "No one can rule in Damascus if the Golan Heights aren't at the top of the agenda," he says. Located just eight kilometers (4.9 miles) outside the Syrian capital, the Israeli military positions on the Golan Heights are within sight of the city. Parliamentarian Georges Jabbour agrees that any policy without the Golan Heights as a priority is unthinkable. "The President isn't at liberty when it comes to this issue," Jabbour says. "If he gave up on the Golan Heights, every Syrian would oppose him. I myself would oppose him."

    Syria is also not in the mood to accept any mediators -- neither from Arab nor from European states -- the foreign ministry expert said. "If the Americans want something from us," he said, "let them come and ask us directly." Until the United States demonstrates their willingness to compromise, Syria will continue to build its "front of obstruction," he said. In other words, Syria will work to unite the enemies of the United States and Israel, sabotage US policy in the region and strengthen local resistance -- be it in Lebanon, the Palestinian territories or Iraq. But if the Americans are genuinely accommodating, Syria will react positively. "In the end," he said, "Syria wants to be in contact with the West again."
    more at link...

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    • #92
      Re: Israel VS Syria Part II

      I don't see Israel pulling out from the Golan's, unless they are given
      are forced into it by the U.S.(which I doubt would happen). Maybe
      Syria is thinking about an attack on the area, Israel's ground
      forces are a bit spread out, but the Air Force should be able to
      reduce Syrias army and air force to rubble in a few short hours.
      Matthew 5:14
      "You are the light of the world. A city situated on a hill cannot be hidden.

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      • #93
        Re: Israel VS Syria Part II

        Tennken....did you read the report that Syria had 30 tanks on the border and was seen moving land mines? I don't know...I just can't see Syria springing an attack on Israel now, unless God puts a thought in their head, or hooks in their jaws in order to prove Israel some more.

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        • #94
          Re: Israel VS Syria Part II

          I did see that report, they would need a lot more than 30 tanks
          to even put a dent into the IDF. You are right, God could put
          a thought into them and they make a dash for Israel. We must
          always remember that God is in control.
          Matthew 5:14
          "You are the light of the world. A city situated on a hill cannot be hidden.

          Comment


          • #95
            Re: Israel VS Syria Part II

            00:32 Assad: Chance for peace with Israel low, Syria will liberate Golan Heights (Haaretz)

            http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/ShTickers.html

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            • #96
              Re: Israel VS Syria Part II

              Syria President Assad Threatens War

              Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2006 10:26 a.m. EDT
              Syrian President Bashar Al-Assad says his country is prepared for war with Israel and warned that the Golan Heights would be seized "by Syrian hands.”
              http://www.newsmax.com/archives/ic/2...740.shtml?s=ic

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              • #97
                So, if Damascus is bombed

                A question for you international law students.

                If Damascus is nuked (or any country's capital, for example), and another country's embassy is destroyed with their people vaporized, then can that action be considered an act of war? (Remember the Chinese embasy the USA bombed in Bosnia?)
                Jim C. Meador

                Isaiah 13:12 (my version)
                I will make a man more precious than fine gold; even a man than the golden WEDG of Millenium Weekend Ministries.

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                • #98
                  Re: So, if Damascus is bombed

                  Originally posted by Jim C. Meador
                  A question for you international law students.

                  If Damascus is nuked (or any country's capital, for example), and another country's embassy is destroyed with their people vaporized, then can that action be considered an act of war? (Remember the Chinese embasy the USA bombed in Bosnia?)
                  Embassy compounds are typically viewed and treated as being the sovergn territory of the nation in question, and certainly any nation that was injured could use that as a basis to declare it as an act of war....

                  However the shear magnitude of a nuclear weapon used against any other nation's civilian population could also be seen as grounds for any and all other willing nations (those so inclined) to take actions against the nation that launched the offending weapon in the first place - they could do this under the UN if so agreed - (or under NATO agreements depending on the nations affected) or on their own individually.

                  Comment


                  • #99
                    Re: So, if Damascus is bombed

                    Originally posted by Jim C. Meador
                    A question for you international law students.

                    If Damascus is nuked (or any country's capital, for example), and another country's embassy is destroyed with their people vaporized, then can that action be considered an act of war? (Remember the Chinese embasy the USA bombed in Bosnia?)
                    What are you thinking Jim? Anything specific or a theory?

                    Comment


                    • Re: Israel VS Syria Part II

                      Syria Rejects International Force Along Lebanon Border

                      BEIRUT, Lebanon — Syria's President Bashar Assad was quoted in a TV interview as saying Wednesday that he would consider the deployment of international troops along the Lebanon-Syria border a "hostile" move toward his country.

                      I wonder why Assad would protest peacekeeping troops on his border?


                      I'm sure it has nothing to do with whatever might be on passing trucks coming into Lebanon.

                      _

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                      • Re: Israel VS Syria Part II

                        Originally posted by Rusty
                        Syria Rejects International Force Along Lebanon Border

                        BEIRUT, Lebanon — Syria's President Bashar Assad was quoted in a TV interview as saying Wednesday that he would consider the deployment of international troops along the Lebanon-Syria border a "hostile" move toward his country.
                        I wonder why Assad would protest peacekeeping troops on his border?
                        I'm sure it has nothing to do with whatever might be on passing trucks coming into Lebanon.

                        _
                        Of course not, he is just afraid they will block his view of the Bekka Valley.
                        Matthew 5:14
                        "You are the light of the world. A city situated on a hill cannot be hidden.

                        Comment


                        • Re: Haaretz runner

                          Venezuelan President to visit Syria to bolster ties...Just that runner across the top of the page. I'm beginning to wonder if Hugo Chavez isn't a closet Muslim.

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                          • Re: Israel VS Syria Part II

                            Hugo Chavez also makes be wonder who the real King of the South is in Daniel 11.

                            Comment


                            • Re: Israel VS Syria Part II

                              Wow-LITH--that's something to really mull over. Chavez has come seemingly out of nowhere--and let's face it, Venezuela isn't a country that one thinks of when pondering powerful nations. However, Chavez is moving to put Venezuela on the World Map, in a way that it has never been before.

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